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20130203
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Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)
true? >> it is fairly important. >> thinly vailed as an exploration of his foreign policy positions, the game was more gotcha than global strategy. >> but i'll -- >> sdeshs your judgment as to whether you were right or wrong about the search. >> i'll explain why i made those comments. >> i want to know if they were right or wrong. that's a direct question. i expect a direct answer. >> if you would like me to explain why. >> i actually would like an answer. yes or no. >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no. i feel it's far more complicated than that. >> the nominee for defense secretary was reportedly asked to claire fews his hiss position on nuclear disarmament. it proved more an opportunity for senators inhoff and graham to show that he is in favor of immediate elimination of all nuclear weapons. chuck hagel wasn't having any of it. >> my position, some of the individuals national security leaders as senator nunn talked about, including himself, has never been unilateral disarmament. ever. never. we have over the years which i have supported the united states has led in red
said that the surge would be "the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam"? were you correct or incorrect? yes or no? >> my reference to the surge -- >> are you answering the question, senator hagel? the question is were you right or wrong? that's a pretty straightforward question. >> well -- >> i would like the answer whether you were right or wrong, and then you are free to elaborate. >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no answer on a lot of things. >> well, let the record show you refused to answer that question. now please go ahead. >> well, if you would like me to explain why -- >> i actually would like an answer. yes or no? >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no. i think it's far more complicated than that. >> senator mccain and a lot of republican washington is banking on the lesson learned from the iraq war, being that we should have started that war, we should have escalated that war, we should have kept that war going, and now ten years on our only regret about the iraq war should be that we're not still there. and the only thing w
croft was pointing out in the interview, saying they had no major foreign policy accomplishments, major ones, that is, that they could hold high was his question in the first four years. will that change for kerry? will that be different in this second term with hillary clinton gone? >> i think there are some openings for the obama administration that weren't there in the first four years. you know, we're out of iraq. we're going to be out of afghanistan, our troops out of afghanistan at the end of next year. i think there are going to be some foreign policy challenges with iran and syria and libya and who knows where. and maybe a little bit more of an opening for foreign policy. we also know that presidents in their second term, they tend to turn to foreign policy in those final two years when it is so hard to get things through congress. so i would say, you know, and he's got a secretary of state who's very experienced in john kerry and who also has a relationship with barack obama. >> is there anything he can't do now that secretary clinton will be -- again, friday is her last day. w
correct or incorrect when you said that the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam? were you correct or incorrect? yes or no? >> my reference to the surge being the most dangerous -- >> answer the question, senator hagel. the question is were you right or wrong? that's a pretty straightforward question. i would like you to answer whether you were right or wrong, and then you are free to elaborate. >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no answer on a lot of things today. >> the records show that you refuse to answer that question. now please go ahead. >> well, if you would like me to explain why -- >> i actually would like an answer. yes or no? >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no. i think it's far more complicated than that. as i've already said, my answer is i'll defer that judgment to history. >> i think history has already made a judgment about the surge, sir, and you're on the wrong side of it. >> willie, that actually went on much longer. >> it was awkward. >> than that, and it was badgering. it sort of reminded me
described hagel as a "deeply embedded with a network of pro-iran foreign policy groups that have lobbied to lift economic sanctions and boost u.s. engagement with tehran." texas republican senator john cornyn offered a similar line of attack when he criticized the nomination on mon. >> i cannot support a nominee for defense secretary who thinks we should be tougher on israel and more lenient on iran. >> the group americans for a strong defense, didn't exist till this month. when it was set up apparently for the sole purpose of opposing chuck hagel. led by former rnc communications director danny diaz and romney visor brian hook the group is running is ads is urging democratic senators to vote no. >> barack obama's nominee for secretary of defense wants america to back down. an end to our nuclear program. devastating defense cuts, a weaker country. >> another group, american future fund has ads questioning hagel's ethics calling on the senate to post phone the hear. finally a group that purports to be coming from the left supported by members of the gay and lesbian community. the group ha
-- and so you've had a lot to say about foreign policy. you've also had a thing or two to say about the republican position on taxes and a number of other issues. so i wonder, is your view that republicans need to get right on foreign policy and can that that is really a core issue that's affecting everything else, or do you see that fundamentally as a garnish on the salad, something maybe we ought to -- a nice to have, not an essential? >> you know, i think we need as a party to have -- i won't try to say his last name because i always butcher it myself -- i think we need john and bill need that wing of the party, but we also need realists that acted and thought and saw the world like we with did when we were in congress in the 1990s, when we controlled congress from '94 on where we believe inside a restrained foreign policy. .. as long as republicans have a coherent foreign policy, i think americans will go along with it. i think our bigger problem from the bush era came from the fact he's a big government republican. he came in with $155 billion surplus. when you left we had a tr
our state department, and to work with me in tackling this ambitious foreign policy agenda. >> reporter: what was hillary clinton's initial reaction when you told her, look, they're considering you for the possibility of secretary of state. >> she didn't believe it. >> reporter: one of clinton's closest aides. >> i e-mailed her, i think it was the friday after election day, after hearing it from two reporters. and i'm pretty sure her reply was something along the lines of, not for a million reasons. >> if she was hesitant, why not just say no? >> i think she did, or came awfully close. i think the president was very persuasive. >> we're delighted to welcome senator clinton secretary of state designate. >> reporter: clinton was quickly confirmed. but how would she get along with the man who defeated her campaign? could she work for him? >> everyone expected, including myself, that there would be a lot of division, a lot of secretary clinton going behind the president's back. >> so was there any tension coming in between the two people at the top? >> i think everyone's been s
there? i mean, vietnam has been sort of major thing, impacting american foreign policy for decades and obama administration first post-vietnam administration among democrats. not vietnam people and bringing it back in to the equation so what impact do you think vietnam will have on us going forward? >> i think if you look at his prepared statements, or the statements he delivered this morning, he said his view on the circumstances that should guide deploying troops to harm's way, to combat should be very, very specific and very, very carefully thought out. and i think that's a philosophy that's very much grounded in his experience as a combat veteran, as an enlisted soldier who saw combat and the reality of war. so i think, you know, i think from that perspective, that outlook is likely to shape how he conducts the afghan draw down, what advice to the white house about how quickly to pull troops and any future engagements across the world in places such as africa, elsewhere in the middle east, where you're seeing some troubles emerge and some calls for a greater u.s. intervention.
. >> reporter: hagel talked about the surge with scorn. >> the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam if it's carried out. >> reporter: a source close to mccain said the friends just drifted apart, as friends sometimes do. not because of policy differences. but even mccain acknowledges the change. >> i've noticed over the years that our views on the united states of america and what we should be doing in the world has diverged rather dramatically. >> reporter: by mccain's 2008 presidential run, hagel was more in line with barack obama. the two traveled together on a mideast trip obama used to beef up his foreign policy chops. and hagel was never seen on mccain's straight talk express. and mccain has been very careful to say he will not block hagel's nomination to be the president's defense secretary, but he also says he's not sure if he will vote for him because of their deep differences now over big issues like iran and afghanistan. mccain's questioning of hagel at this morning's hearing will be the most highly anticipated because of their differences on
problems. governance is bad and south america, for example, that's where foreign policy comes in to it. we have to work with governments to make things better in their own countries and an investment of soft power looking at sequestration and look at when's important. border, working with allies to stop certain terrorist acts and using soft influence to make things better for folks in latin america. >> colonel, ronald reagan promised border security and i think a lot of republicans feel a little disillusioned about that. and when you talk about our allies -- >> right. >> -- obvious to the south, mexico, on the board and brian terry, what are the kinds of things we should be asking of mexico? what are the kinds of solutions we should be looking to mexico to bring to the table to solve a mutual problem? >> glad you brought that up. my next book, it comes out in june, we talk about regarding criminal and terrorist activity and what should be done by the friendly governments. frankly, they have to do more to help their people want to stay in mexico and the other countries further down and a hu
. as we all know, senator kerry has played a leading role in shaping american foreign policy for many years in his position on the foreign relations committee and as chair of that distinguished committee. as chair of that, he was instrumental in securing passage of the new start treaty, an arms control accord with russia that is helping to reduce the danger of nuclear proliferation. he has served as a trusted special envoy to afghanistan, sudan and pakistan at crucial moments. senator kerry advocated for democratic elections in the philippines. he was part of the delegation that uncovered the fraud that ultimately led to the removal of president ferdinand marcos. he was a strong proponent of u.s. action to end ethnic cleansing in kosovo and to impose sanctions on burma tied to human rights abuses. senator kerry has been a leader in promoting economic development and recovery in haiti, fighting global hiv-aids, supporting democracy and human dignity, and the advancement of human empowerment throughout the world. in his early days in the senate, senator kerry and i -- in fact, we were e
fighter jets to egypt. here is louie gohmert on "fox & friends." this administration's foreign policy. the foreign policy is, what difference does it make? hey, what difference does it make if we give our sworn enemies, people who want to wipe israel and us off the map, so we give them the method to wipe them out? what's the big deal? we're putting ourselves in jeopardy when we're sending jets and tanks to a man who a leader whose only two enemies he he said in the past are israel and the united states are resupplying our enemies with the means to fight us. the founder and president of the amaker islamic forum and philosophy. thanks for being on the show. >> thanks, clayton for having me. >> if you listen to the congressman. he makes it sound as if egypt is our sworn enemy right now. is that the case? and, if so, why are we sending them the numbers i see 16 f-16s and 200 abraham's tanks by the end of the year? >> >> it's pretty horrifying clayton that we are doing. this and goes beyond the weaponry this is about supporting ideology sworn against the united states, against the west, ag
and then we talk about our wonderful foreign policy. >> gretchen: she did talk about the fact that she did believe that the world was a more dangerous place now than ever before. but that was in the second part of the interview. the first part of the interview before the commercial break was talking about the relationship between president obama and mrs. clinton. i want now listen to this and then get your reaction. >> i just want to have a chance of to publicly say thank you 'cause i think hillary will go down as one of the finest secretary of states we have. >> after i ended my campaign, i immediately did everything i could to help the president get elected because despite our hard fought primary, we had such agreement on what needed to be done for our country. >> it made for tough debates. >> it did. >> we could never figure out what we differed on. >> yeah. we worked at that pretty hard. >> i consider hillary a strong friend. >> very warm, close. i think there is a sense of understanding that sometimes doesn't even take words because we have similar views. we have similar experiences t
street, perhaps a shift in foreign policy. >> steve: what else? >> it also says that the president is looking to people who he trusts. the thing about this president that needs to be understood is that he's willing to appoint people who may have opposed him. you have to realize he appointed hillary clinton. he appointed joe biden. now he has appointed john kerry. these are all people who ran against him for president. ray lahood is a republican. so the president will appoint people ho disagree with him, but at the same time, he wants people who he believes he can trust. look at dennis mcdonough who will be the chief of staff. he raised him up out of the national security council. >> steve: shower. what about some critics, and there is a picture right there. what about critics who say he's a control freak and he winds up getting rid of people who he's got a problem with? >> he's the president of the united states. he has to make the decisions ultimately. i dealt with the president on health care issue and frankly, he wouldn't budge. he had his opinion. he stayed with it. and ultimat
of the topics include foreign policy, and control, and women's abortion rights. it begins at noon eastern with cdc's "meet the press." at 1:00 p.m., but the ranking member of the foreign relations committees, senator john mccain, of addendas -- bob menendez. at two o'clock p.m. it is "fox news sunday." and assistant majority leader -- the state of the union follows at 3:00 p.m.. also a retired general and former cia director. administered by dianne feinstein and gov. bob macdonald of virginia and gov. scott walker of wisconsin. at 4:00, bob schieffer talks with senator dianne feinstein. the sending network talk shows this afternoon on c-span radio are brought to you by a public service by the network and c- span. the re-air begins -- you can listen to them all on c- span radio. nationwide on at some satellite radio channel 119. you can listen to on your smart phone or go online to c- spanradio.org >> what is the best training for a policeman? >> the best training -- you learn how to develop sources, you learn how the use intelligence information, you learn how to leverage relationships. t
a foreign policy that can doing development as well as diplomacy that can reach out to women's groups, to youth, to entrepreneurs, to religious groups. that's the softer side. but it's also the smart side. and it's not john kerry's natural bailiwick, but it's very important that he build on that legacy. >> i take it that state department will be much different under kerry. and marie slaughter, thank you very much for joining us. >> thank you. >>> a woman accused of stabbing her boyfriend more than 20 times is claiming self-defense. it's one of the hottest trials going on right now. we'll dig deeper on the jodi arias trial with hln's jane velez-mitchell just ahead. >> one day when he drove home from a little league game, i saw a homeless man with a cardboard sign that said "need a meal." so i told my mom i wanted to do something. >> will larsy is a 9-year-old child. i hesitate to call him child. i think he's in a category of his own. as a 7-year-old, he decided he was going to take on this issue of hunger. >> welcome to frogs. >> my group is called frogs and it means friends reaching o
for immigration reform. later, the president's state of the union address. how foreign and defense policy will be handled. and then former representative gabrielle giffords, her husband, mark kelly, and wayne lapierre testify on gun violence. massachusetts governor patrick appointed the chief of staff as the interim senate replacement for a senator john kerry, william cowan. you can see the entire event on our website at c-span.org. >> i am not running for office at any time now or in the future. the governor actually offered me this opportunity yesterday. i was aware that i was among the list of candidates, but as many of you know, i have focused since november on planning my return to the private sector, and that is what i had been focused on literally until that day. so -- >> what can possibly get done? >> there is much to be done. as i mentioned, i am not going by myself. we have one of the most experienced congressional caucuses that is in congress. i am going to work with them. i look forward to working with senator warren. good news for all of us is that i will have the benefit of
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)

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